How Long Do Cycling Gloves Last?


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How Long Do Cycling Gloves Last?

With cycling comes a lot of accessories. To push further and faster every time you take the bike out, you need specific kinds of gear to help you operate at your peak condition. Cycling gloves are one of these pieces of equipment.

If you are wary of spending the amount of money some of these gloves cost, you may want to know how long these cycling gloves are meant to last.

So, how long do cycling gloves last? When properly cared for, the consensus is that cycling gloves should last approximately 2,000 to 2,500 miles. The life-span of cycling gloves can vary depending on the type of glove used, the bike, and the additional wear and tear that may cause faster deterioration.

There are so many aspects that can affect the length of your cycling gloves’ lives. From proper fit to correct maintenance, there are many things you can do to ensure that your gloves will last to the furthest mile possible.

The Parts of A Cycling Glove

Four parts comprise a glove, and all of them will matter when it comes to the length of time your gloves will last.

Cycling gloves are made up of cuffs, fingers, palms, and uppers. Below is a more in-depth look at these parts and the ideal material they should be made of for the optimal length of a glove’s life.

  • Cuffs – Cuffs are the part of any glove that encircles the wrist. Cuffs need to fit just right, or the glove will not feel right. If the cuffs are too tight, they will be more uncomfortable and could cut off the circulation to your hands. Too loose, the glove will feel too big and may rub against the wrist, causing chafing. Ideally, the cuff should have a fastener of some kind to be adjusted and fastened down to not flap.
  • Fingers – There are two options for cycling gloves and the fingers on them. There are full-finger gloves and half-finger or fingerless gloves. When choosing which you want, you will need to consider the weather, the type of cycling you do, and your preference.
  • Palms – Palms of cycling gloves are (obviously) the material covering the palm. The big difference between the palms on cycling gloves and other gloves is that the palm is made of thicker material that is also good for gripping.
  • Uppers – Uppers is what the back portion of the glove is called. This material is generally thicker to help protect from the elements. They also usually have some kind of waterproofing.

Different Materials To Choose For Your Cycling Gloves

Cycling gloves can be made out of different materials per each part of the glove. This helps them be precisely what you are looking for to protect as much of your hand as possible and help your gloves last as long as you can.

  • Acrylic – This material is breathable and stretchy. Though warm, it offers nothing else in protection from the weather.
  • Fleece – Fleece is a warm microfibre that is often used for winter cycling gloves. They are insulated and usually have a panel on the uppers that can be used for wiping sweat from your face, but they are not breathable.
  • Polyester – Polyester material has the advantages of being both sweat-wicking and highly breathable; however, it is not water or windproof.
  • Polypropylene – This is a material that is good at resisting wind and other weather elements; however, polypropylene is not good at managing moisture.

Most Common Types of Cycling Gloves

Four parts comprise a glove, and all of them will matter when it comes to the length of time your gloves will last.

Cycling gloves are made up of cuffs, fingers, palms, and uppers. Below is a more in-depth look at these parts and the ideal material they should be made of for the optimal length of a glove’s life.

  • Cycling Mitts – These are fingerless gloves that are great for warmer weather in the summer. They are lightweight but have excellent bar grip and exceptional palm protection in case you fall.
    Full-Finger Gloves – There are more options when it comes to full-finger gloves. They are still made in lightweight and breathable options for summer riding. They have more reinforced options for those riders who go harder.
  • Running Gloves – If you are looking for a warm, light glove that can easily be stowed when not in use, you may want to consider a pair of simple running gloves. However, they have no additional protections in them for grip or falls.
  • Winter Gloves – These have the best protection and are fully insulated to keep hands protected from the cold winter elements. They also provide a lot of protection in case of falls on icy surfaces. However, they are incredibly restrictive and bulky.

See also: 8 Best Cycling Gloves For Hand Numbness

Best Care Instructions For Cycling Gloves

If you want your cycling gloves to last, you have to take care of them. This means keeping them out of the elements when you aren’t using them. It would be best if you also kept them clean, putting them in a lingerie bag and washing them on gentle about once a month. It would be best if you then let them dry completely.

Drying your gloves not only after washing but after they get wet from anything from rain to sweat is key to making your gloves last to that 2,000 – 2,500 mile mark. Most often, the disintegration of gloves is due to moisture causing rot.

If you want to help your gloves last as long as you can, you should have a back-up pair of gloves of comparable quality so that you can rotate them out when your main pair need to dry. This will allow you to practice proper maintenance and allow both pairs to last as long as they were made to, if not longer.

See also:
11 Benefits Of Wearing Cycling Gloves
6 Best MTB Grips For Sore Hands

Ken

Cycling is my source of liberation. The love affair started more than a decade ago when I started cycling for fitness and soon it turned into a passion. The adrenalin rush you feel when you grab the handlebars, put on the helmet, and feel the speed in your nerves is unique in itself.

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